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Model Boat Builder Gallery - Display Models

Model Boat Builder Gallery

Display, Working and Pre-Owned Models.


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waveney1.jpg
Waveney class lifeboat (miniature)673 viewsPerhaps not quite a true scale model, but a very apealingh miniature, which makes a pleasant bookshelf model, not too demanding of display space.
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Waveney class lifeboat (miniature)805 views
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Trent class lifeboat (miniature)550 viewsNot quite as detailed as some of the larger and more detailed lifeboat models, but not nearly so expensive, either, nor is she so demanding of display space.
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Trent class lifeboat (miniature)573 views
trawler1.jpg
Trawler (miniature)513 viewsWe built this pretty little display model of a deepwater trawler from scratch, for a member of the family which had owned her. She was sent to Hawaii as a present for a relative.
The client had to set a tight limit on budget, so we weren't able to go to town on the detail as we might have liked to. She is a pleasant little model, and if nothing else, she illustrates the variety of commissions which we are willing and able to undertake.
(model by Frank Hasted)
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Torrens511 viewsThe lovely "Torrens" was the crack ship on the Australian passenger run. She was the favorite ship of the author Joseph Conrad.
This fine model, a family heirloom, was badly damaged in a house fire. We re-planked three large holes in the hull, cleaned off all traces of charring, and refurbished all the deck fittings.
Due to pressure of time in our own workshop, we contracted out the re-rigging to a local expert. He re-rigged the mizzen mast, which had survived the fire. The fore and main masts were charred stumps, so he replaced them in their entirety. He did a lovely job.
Throughout the entire restoration, it is hard to tell where the old ends and the new begins. This is one of the most sensitive aspects of restoration, and one in which we take great pride. It is a difficult balance, taking great judgement. One has to restore a model to its former glory, without incorpotating so much new material that it loses that lovely patina of age. We feel we succeeded here, and are proud to offer this illustration for your consideration.
(model by unknown builder, circa 1947, hull restoration by John Davies, re-rigged by John Hatchett)
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Thames Barge473 viewsThis is a typical "heirloom model". The client's father had built about the first half of it, before he passed on. He had done a nice job, too. We completed it, so it can take an honoured place in the family home. We always treat a job like this with especial respect.

(model by private builder, completed by John Davies)
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SYLVIA498 viewsThese coastal trading barges used to feed London. I have an old photograph of the Pool of London, absolutely full of them. The riverside warehouses which are now fashionable apartments used to be the city's granary.
The Thames Barge was an astonishingly efficient sailing craft. They had a capacity of up to about a hundred and eighty tons. The crew consisted of a man, a boy and a dog. It was said the dog's job was to bite the boy if he didn't move fast enough. With their shallow draft and leeboards, they could sail in waters where few other craft could venture.
There is a very pleasant pub at Snape, in Suffolk, called the "Plough and Sail", a name which neatly encapsulates the essence of the Suffolk agricultural economy until the advent of the large articulated lorry. It is well inland, up a narrow channel. The barges would work up it to the warehouse. The Snape channel was known to bargemen as one of the most difficult. Then they would load up with corn, slip down-channel, and sail through the narrow channels, or swatchways, that threaded between the many sandbanks of the Thames estuary, going where no other commercial craft would dare to go. If the channel had shifted and they ran aground, their massive timbers and immensely strong construction would save them until the tide rose again. Then it would be up the London River to discharge.
This model, the "Sylvia", was built for a descendant of the Shrubsall family, who were one of the most famous families of barge builders. He now lives in the U.S.A., and his model occupies an honoured place in his house.
(model by John Davies)
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Sovereign of the Seas.428 viewsThe "Sovereign of the Seas was launched in 1637. For her day she was an astonishingly advanced vessel. She was the first three-deck hundred gun line of battle ship, setting a pattern which was to be recogniseably followed for most of the next two hundred years, until fighting sail was superceded by steam. She was a sharp departure from the galleons and their developments which had preceded her. Her rig was similarly advanced for its day. She was the first Royal Naval vessel to cross royal yards. Her decoration was more ornate than any vessel before or since, causing the Dutch, against whom she fought, to call her the "Golden Devil"
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Sovereign of the Seas.428 viewsShe cost £65,187, at a time when a workman might earn £5 per year. Today's protestors against Trident might reflect cynically that extravagant expenditure on the ultimate weapon of its day is obviously nothing new. However, in those days the British populace was less docile. The Ship Money tax which Charles the First raised to pay for her was a major contributory factor to the Civil War, in which his Government was overthrown, and he was executed
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Sovereign of the Seas.450 viewsShe makes a magnificent and spectacular model. The client for this example chose to have her built without her rig. Many museums have models which are displayed in this fashion. It sets off the magnificence of the hull without distractions, and considerably reduces storage space and the risk of damage.
(Model by Frank Hasted)
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Small Colin Archer; Port Quarter view.501 viewsBuilt to a tight deadline for a wedding present, she makes a pretty picture.
(Model by John Davies)
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